Conspiracy Brews 8.16.14

If you like your coffee, tea, hot chocolate and your politics flavorful, served with a heaping dose of civility by a diverse group of interesting people from all parts of the political spectrum then you should be joining us every Saturday. Started in 2007 over coffee and lively conversation by a group of concerned friends and neighbors, ‘Conspiracy Brews’ is committed to finding solutions to some of our State’s toughest problems. Our zest for constructive political discourse is only equaled by our belief that the only way forward is to exchange our views in a relaxed and friendly setting. For additional information or to be added to our e-mail list contact: ConspiracyBrews@aol.com.

Conspiracy Brews

ConspiracyBrews

“Be civil to all; sociable to many; familiar with few; friend to one; enemy to none.”

Benjamin Franklin

Not your average political discussion group!

August 16, 2014

9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
at
Southwest Secondary Learning Center
10301 Candelaria Rd NE
(northwest corner of Candelaria and Morris)

We think that government should be open and honest at all times.
People from all political parties are welcome.

*** Quotes of the Week ***

“Those who abuse liberty when they possess it would abuse power could they obtain it.”

Thomas Paine

“The body politic, like the human body, begins to die from birth, and bears in itself the causes of its destruction.”

Jean Jacques Rousseau

The tomb of Rousseau in the crypt of the Panth...

The tomb of Rousseau in the crypt of the Panthéon, Paris (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Suggested Topics

– Are you for or against the militarization of the police?

http://time.com/3111474/rand-paul-ferguson-police/

–Can we overcome and change the NM dependency on government for jobs?

– If Rio Arriba County is the # 1 drug capital of the USA, what does that say about NM?

Seal of Rio Arriba County, New Mexico

Seal of Rio Arriba County, New Mexico (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

(Light Quotes of the week)

“After twelve years of therapy, my psychiatrist said something that brought tears to my eyes. He said, ‘No hablo ingles.’.”

Ronnie Shakes

“A statesman is a politician who has been dead ten or fifteen years.”

Harry Truman

“A boy can learn a lot from a dog: obedience, loyalty, and the importance of turning around three times before lying down.”

Robert Benchley

——-

Way to go, Mr. O

rubbleobamalegacy2webcr_7_1_14

No thanks to give Mr. O.  Here is his method of winning in Iraq:

Obama's Iraq "withdrawal" in a nutshell

Obama’s Iraq “withdrawal” in a nutshell (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Conspiracy Brews 8.9.14

Conspiracy Brews

Authored by Kim Hilliard

avatar

If you like your coffee and your politics flavorful, served with a heaping dose of civility by a diverse group of interesting people from all parts of the political spectrum then you should be joining us every Saturday. Started in 2007 over coffee and lively conversation by a group of concerned friends and neighbors, ‘Conspiracy Brews’ is committed to finding solutions to some of our State’s toughest problems. Our zest for constructive political discourse is only equaled by our belief that the only way forward is to exchange our views in a relaxed and friendly setting. For additional information or to be added to our e-mail list contact: ConspiracyBrews@aol.com.

Conspiracy Brews

“Be civil to all; sociable to many; familiar with few; friend to one; enemy to none.”

Benjamin Franklin

Not your average political discussion group!

August 09, 2014

9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
at
Southwest Secondary Learning Center
10301 Candelaria Rd NE
(northwest corner of Candelaria and Morris)

We think that government should be open and honest at all times.
People from all political parties are welcome.

*** Quotes of the Week ***

“The opinions of men are not the object of civil government, nor under its jurisdiction.”

Thomas Jefferson

“The law should be equal for all, whether it rewards or punishes, whether it protects or restrains.”

Thomas Paine

Suggested Topics

– Is Albuquerque a violent city?

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/03/opinion/sunday/goodbye-albuquerque-land-of-violence.html?emc=eta1&_r=0

– So explain what the $500 Mil for Tesla consists of?

– If Rio Arriba County is the # 1 drug capital of the USA, what does that say about NM?

Seal of Rio Arriba County, New Mexico

Seal of Rio Arriba County, New Mexico (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

(Light Quotes of the week)

“After a year in therapy, my psychiatrist said to me, ‘Maybe life isn’t for everyone.’.”

Larry Brown

“Some people are always late, like the late King George V.”

Spike Mulligan

“There is nothing more exhilarating than to be shot at without result.”

Winston Churchill

——-

Harvest Festival At Wildlife West 8.16-17.14

Pie donations needed for pie auction on Aug 16th Chuckwagon
From: Wildlifewest Park <wildlifewestpark@msn.com>
Date: Monday, August 4, 2014 9:39 AM
Subject: Wildlife West Harvest Fest 8/16 & 17

Harvest Festival at Wildlife West

 

The annual Harvest Festival is coming up on Saturday and Sunday, August 16-17, 2014, at Wildlife West Nature Park, in Edgewood. It’s a time to celebrate the area’s culture, traditions and agricultural heritage. Visitors will experience the rich history of the pinto bean farming in the Pinto Bean Museum, which displays antique bean processing equipment, farming artifacts and historic local photos. The Northern Rio Grande National Heritage Foundation provided funding for the museum and the collection of farming equipment.

 

The Festival opens on Saturday morning with a tractor parade beginning at 9 a.m. at Wildlife West, traveling west along historic Route 66 and ending at the Tractor Supply Company. The tractor games will be held on Sunday this year, beginning at 2 p.m. on the field in front of the historic Pinto Bean Barn.

 

Visitors can stroll through the park and have fun experiencing an old west atmosphere. They can explore a replica of the western town of Venus (original name of Edgewood), and see blacksmith demonstrations, weaving and spinning demonstrations, and antique cars and trucks. Also on showcase will be old iron tractors, steam engines, corn shellers and other historic ranch equipment.

 

Other activities include behind the scenes black bear tours, snake and reptile identification presentations by the New Mexico Herpetological Society, and artistic chainsaw techniques demonstration by Mark Chavez, renowned chainsaw artists. Then take an old-fashioned hayride around the park. There will be games for children, opportunity to experience wildlife up close, and artists and vendors.

 

Anasazi Fields Winery will be on hand on Saturday for wine tasting. Throughout the weekend, the Knights of Columbus volunteers will serve up pinto beans, fresh sweet corn, and hamburgers and hot dogs.

 

Don’t miss the Chuckwagon Dinner Show on Saturday, 6 – 9 p.m. Come early for the activities during the day and stay for the evening free-flight peregrine falcon show, pie auction, barbeque dinner and Holy Water & Whiskey western-swing music concert. Reservations for the dinner show are required by 2 p.m. on the day of the show. Chuckwagon tickets are $25 for adults, $23 for seniors, $12 for children 5-11, and kids under 5 are free.

 

All activities throughout the weekend, except for the Chuckwagon dinner show, are included with regular admission to the park: $7 for adults, $6 for seniors, $4 students and children under 5 are free. Music performances are presented in a covered all-weather amphitheater. Plus free dry camping and parking.

 Pie donations needed for pie auction on Aug 16th Chuckwagon

Wildlife West is located just 25 minutes east of Albuquerque, off Interstate-40 and legendary Route 66 in Edgewood. For more information at visit http://www.wildlifewest.org or call 505-281-7655 or toll-free 1-877-981-WILD (9453).

Pie donations needed for pie auction on Aug 16th Chuckwagon

Harvest Festival:

When: Saturday & Sunday, August 16 & 17, 2014
Where: Wildlife West Nature Park, 87 North Frontage Road, Edgewood, NM
What:
Saturday 8/16
9 a.m. Tractor Parade
10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Wildlife tours, snake & reptile identification presentations, games for kids, tractor & machinery displays, blacksmith demonstrations, food and wine tasting
6 p.m. Free-flight peregrine falcon show
7 p.m. Chuckwagon dinner (must RSVP by 2 pm day of show)
8 p.m. Holy Water & Whiskey western music
Sunday 8/17
10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Wildlife tours, snake identification presentations, games for kids, tractor & machinery displays, blacksmith demonstrations, & food vendors
2 p.m. Tractor games

 

 

National Family Night Out 8.5.14

The following is sent from Edgewood Police Chief Fred Radosevich:

I have attached the flyer for the national Night Out and Movie night the Police Department will be holding on Tuesday August 5th beginning at 7:00 PM at the Athletic Fields here in Edgewood. Please stop by and enjoy the evening with us.

Chief Fred Radosevich

Edgewood Police Department

1916 Old Hwy 66

PO Box 3610

Edgewood NM,87015

505-281-5717

FamilyNitht Out

Nancy Pelosi — Needs to straighten up

She could start with a “strait”jacket and a muzzle as she becomes increasingly irrelevant and irreverent with her antics on the floor of the House. Her latest tirade had her running across from her place in the House chamber to berate, or should we say, attempt to berate a fellow congressperson from across the aisle.  Here’s the URL for the story from the blaze:

The Harridan Speaks And Gestures

Al Gore and Nancy Pelosi

Al Gore and Nancy Pelosi (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Two harbingers of hate and mistaken messages

 

Roger Mickelson’s History Today 8.2.14

American Revolution: In 1776, members of the Continental Congress began signing the Declaration of Independence. A committee consisting of Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston had been chosen on June 11 to prepare a statement justifying the decision to assert independence, should it be taken. The document was prepared, and on July 1 nine delegations voted for separation. On the following day, July 2, with the New York delegation abstaining only because it lacked permission to act, the Lee resolution for independence was voted on and endorsed. (The convention of New York gave its consent on July 9, and the New York delegates voted affirmatively on July 15.) On July 19 the Congress ordered the document to be engrossed as “The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America.” It was accordingly put on parchment, probably by Timothy Matlack of Philadelphia. Members of the Congress present on August 2 affixed their signatures to this parchment copy on that day, and others later. The last signer was Thomas McKean of Delaware, whose name was not placed on the document before 1777.
So why do we celebrate Independence Day on July 4?

Congress Voting Independence, a depiction of t...

Congress Voting Independence, a depiction of the Second Continental Congress voting on the United States Declaration of Independence. Oil on canvas. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

July Revolution: In 1830, Charles X of France abdicated the throne, unable to resist the revolt.

English: Charles X of France

English: Charles X of France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1876, James Butler (Wild Bill) Hickok—a frontiersman, marksman, gambler, and legend of the American West—was murdered in the city of Deadwood, South Dakota Territory. It was there, at a poker table in Nuttall & Mann’s No. 10 saloon, that Hickok was shot dead by a drunken stranger, Jack McCall. The cards Hickok was holding—a pair of black aces and a pair of black eights plus an unknown fifth card—became known as the dead man’s hand. McCall’s motive was never learned; he was tried, convicted of murder, and hanged on March 1, 1877.

Signage for Wild Bill Hickok's Grave

Signage for Wild Bill Hickok’s Grave (Photo credit: Lietmotiv)

In 1923, President Warren Gamaliel Harding suddenly died from either a heart attack or stroke. John Calvin Coolidge became president.

English: Calvin Coolidge. 30th President of th...

English: Calvin Coolidge. 30th President of the United States (1923-1929) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

World War II: In 1939, Albert Einstein signed a letter to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt urging creation of an atomic weapons research program. That letter was delivered to Roosevelt by one of his economic advisers, Alexander Sachs, on October 11. Roosevelt wrote back on October 19, informing Einstein that he had organized the Uranium Committee to study the issue.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1933. Lietuvių: Fra...

Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1933. Lietuvių: Franklinas Delanas Ruzveltas (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1990, Iraq’s leader, Ṣaddām Ḥussein, ordered the invasion and occupation of Kuwait with the apparent aim of acquiring that nation’s large oil reserves, canceling a large debt Iraq owed Kuwait, and expanding Iraqi power in the region. On August 3 the United Nations Security Council called for Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait, and on August 6 the council imposed a worldwide ban on trade with Iraq. Iraq’s subsequent refusal to withdraw its troops sparked the Persian Gulf War, in which an international force led by the United States quickly defeated Iraq.

iraq

iraq (Photo credit: The U.S. Army)

Regards, Roger Mickelson
Source material includes Associated Press International and Encyclopædia Britannica.
“If words of command are not clear and distinct, if orders are not thoroughly understood, then the general is to blame. But, if orders are clear and the soldiers nevertheless disobey, then it is the fault of their officers.” Sun Tzu

Marita Noon: Looking for bad legislation … you could start with 2007 and ethanol mandates

Greetings!

 

I am writing to you today from Atlanta where I will be speaking tomorrow at a “Stop the EPA Power Grab” rally on the steps of the Sam Nunn Federal Building in Atlanta GA. Wednesday I am on the docket to speak at the EPA’s Atlanta hearing regarding its Clean Power Plan that I wrote about on June 2 (I expect next week’s column will reflect my experiences there). Yesterday I was in Knoxville, TN, where I spoke to the 32nd annual meeting of Doctors for Disaster Preparedness (DDP) where, among other things, I addressed the Clean Power Plan.

 

On Thursday afternoon, while on a bus during a tour of Oak Ridge National Labs as a part of the DDP meeting,  a little piece of news arrived in my in box. The headline read: “White House indicates ethanol mandate could go up.” “What?!” I thought. I know that last fall the EPA did something reasonable: it reduced the volume of ethanol required to be blended into gasoline. There has been legislation in the works to modify or kill the 2007 ethanol mandate. The Ethanol tax credit died in January of 2012. Now, unexpectedly, news that the White House is directly involved in bumping it up? Wow, that is news.

 

In this week’s column: 2007–a great year for growing bad legislation like the ethanol mandate (attached and pasted-in-below), I offer some history and context and then address the Thursday meeting John Podesta had with “select Senate Democrats” that happened while the rest of the world wasn’t paying attention. The meeting got very little news coverage—though Senator Al Franken is crowing about it. Please help me spread the news by posting, passing on, and/or personally enjoying 2007–a great year for growing bad legislation like the ethanol mandate.

 

Thanks!

 

Marita Noon

Marita Noon

Executive Director, Energy Makes America Great, inc.

PO Box 52103, Albuquerque, NM 87181

505.239.8998

 

 

For immediate release: July 28, 2014

Commentary by Marita Noon

Executive Director, Energy Makes America Great Inc.

Contact: 505.239.8998, marita@responsiblenergy.org

Words: 1273

 

2007: a great year for growing bad legislation like the ethanol mandate

President Obama, and his administration, has enacted so many foolish and cost-increasing energy policies, it is easy to think that they are his purview alone. But in 2007, Republicans were just as guilty. Seeds were planted and a garden of bad legislation took root in a totally different energy environment. At the time, the growth seemed like something worthy of cultivation. However, what sprouted up more closely resembles a weed that needs to be yanked out.

 

Last week, I wrote about Australia’s carbon tax that was pulled on July 17. Its seeds were also planted in 2007, though not germinated until 2011. Prime Minister Abbott promised to eradicate the unpopular plant—and after nearly a year of struggle, he did.

 

2007 was also the year of the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). Around that time, more than half the states put in a mandate requiring increasing amounts of wind and solar power be incorporated into the energy mix the local utilities provided for their customers. It was expected that the RPS would become a much-admired garden with wind turbines blowing in the breeze and solar panels turning toward the sun like sunflowers.

 

Instead, the RPS has been an expensive folly. Angering the ratepayers, electricity prices have gone up. Groups, like the American Bird Conservancy, have filed suit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service because it allows bald and golden eagles to be chopped up by wind turbines without punishment to the operators. Industrial solar installations are in trouble due to the massive land use and literally frying birds that fly through the reflected sunlight. The mandates have created false markets and bred crony corruption that has the beneficiaries squawking when legislatures threaten to pull plans that have grown like kudzu. Yet, many states have now introduced legislation to trim, or uproot, the plans that sounded so good back in 2007. Though none has actually been yanked out, Ohio just put a pause on its RPS.

 

The RPS was state legislation; the RFS, federal.

 

Enacted, in 2005 and strengthened in 2007, the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS)—also known as the ethanol mandate—had true bipartisan support (something that is difficult to imagine in today’s political climate). Both Republicans and Democrats lauded the RFS as America’s solution to U.S. dependence on foreign oil. In signing the Energy Independence and Security Act that contained the RFS, President George W. Bush promised it would end our addiction to oil by growing our gas. Although it was passed by Congress with the best of intentions, it, too, has become a costly, wasteful, and politically-charged fiasco that has created an artificial market for corn-based ethanol and driven up both fuel and food prices while threatening to damage millions of families’ most prized and essential possessions: their cars and trucks.

 

Times have changed. People are no longer lining up to view the garden of renewables as they do to stroll through the spectacular floral displays at Las Vegas’ Bellagio—where teams of specialized staff maintain the stylized gardens. At the Bellagio, you can gaze gratis. America’s renewable garden is costly at a time when our citizens are forced to cut back on everything else.

 

Compared to 2007, several things are different today. The big one is the economy. We, as a country, were still living large in 2007. We were also still dependent on oil from overseas and our purchases were funding terrorism. Plus, it was, then, generally believed by many that our globe was warming—and it was our fault because of burning fossil fuels. When presented with the idea of growing our gasoline, even though it might cost more, it seemed worth it—after all, what was a few cents a gallon to thumb our nose at the Middle East and save the planet?

 

But this is a different day. A few cents a gallon matters now. Thanks to the combined technologies of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, America is rich with oil-and-gas resources—and we could be truly energy secure if there were greater access to federal lands. Since 2007, the U.S. has trimmed our CO2 emissions—while they’ve grown globally. The predicted warming (and accompanying catastrophes) hasn’t happened. Instead, it appears that the increased CO2 has generated record harvests—despite predictions to the contrary.

 

But the seeds planted in 2007 have grown false markets that need the mandates—both for electricity generation and transportation fuels—to stake them up, as they can’t survive on their own. Talk of yanking the mandates is likened to cutting down the once-a-year blossom of the Queen of the Night. “How could you?”  “You’ll kill jobs!”  Elected officials, such as Congressman Steve King (R-IA), who are normally fiscally conservative, vote to continue the boondoggles that benefit his state.

 

When the Energy Independence and Security Act was passed in 2007, it was assumed that gasoline demand would continue to rise indefinitely so larger volumes of ethanol could be blended into gasoline every year to create E10, a motor fuel comprised of 90 percent gasoline and 10 percent ethanol. Rather than requiring a percentage of ethanol, the law mandated a growing number of gallons of ethanol be used.

 

Instead, due to increased vehicle efficiencies and a bad economy, gasoline demand peaked in 2007 and began to decline, reducing the amount of gasoline consumed in the U.S. Still, the law requires refiners to blend ever-increasing volumes of ethanol into gasoline every year until 36 billion gallons of ethanol is blended into the nation’s fuel supplies by 2022.

 

It is the mandate that allowed the ethanol tax credit (a.k.a. subsidy) to expire at beginning of 2012. The growing mandates gave the corn farmers plenty of incentive.

 

In the modern era, with ethanol no longer needed due to America’s increasing oil production and the mandates’ unreasonable requirements, an unusual collection of opponents has risen up against ethanol: environmentalists and big oil, auto manufacturers and anti-hunger groups.

 

Much to everyone’s surprise, last November the EPA came out with a proposal to use its authority to make a practical decision to keep the mandate from increasing that resulted in a cut in the amount of biofuels that refiners would need to mix into their fuels—a decision that was required to be made by the end of November 2013. To date, in the seventh month of 2014, the EPA still has not released the 2014 mandates. Refiners are still waiting.

 

On Thursday, July 24, White House Advisor John Podesta met with select Democrat Senators including Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) and Al Franken (D-MN) to discuss the EPA’s November 2013 proposal to lower ethanol targets—which, according to reports, Franken called: “unacceptable.” The Hill quotes Franken as saying: “White House adviser John Podesta has indicated the administration plans to raise the amount of ethanol and other biofuels that must be blended into the nation’s fuel supply.” And, in another report, The Hill says: “That may mean Podesta’s signal—that the levels of ethanol, biodiesel and other biofuels will be increased in the EPA’s final rule—is as good as gold.” A decision from the EPA is expected to “be imminent.”

 

All of this amid new reports that ethanol has little if any effect on reducing greenhouse gas emissions blamed for climate change. A Congressional Budget Office report, released on June 26, states: “available evidensce suggests that replacing gasoline with corn ethanol has only limited potential for reducing emissions (and some studies indicate that it could increase emissions).”

 

It may have been Bush who planted the ethanol mandate, but it is the Obama administration that is fertilizing it and keeping it alive, when it should be yanked out by its roots.

 

 

 

The author of Energy Freedom, Marita Noon serves as the executive director for Energy Makes America Great Inc. and the companion educational organization, the Citizens’ Alliance for Responsible Energy (CARE). Together they work to educate the public and influence policy makers regarding energy, its role in freedom, and the American way of life. Combining energy, news, politics, and, the environment through public events, speaking engagements, and media, the organizations’ combined efforts serve as America’s voice for energy.