Marita Noon: Environmental Shakedown through bastardized application of science, policy & education

 

Greetings!

This week’s column, Environmental Shakedown through bastardized application of science (attached and pasted-in-below), policy and education, is really an exposé on the Center for Biological Diversity. When I was at 700ish words, I wondered how I’d get to 1000ish. But then, I started talking to the authors of the various CBD pieces on the internet. Wow! It is amazing that one group can be so hated by such a wide variety of differing interest groups. Environmental Shakedown through bastardized application of science ended up long.  Sorry.  L

What I discovered in writing Environmental Shakedown through bastardized application of science is that there is not one complete CBD exposé out there—but there surely is enough material for one. I’d really like to write a full 5000+ version like I did for Mora County and like I did for Abengoa—though doing so would likely invite a lawsuit threat (CBD loves to threaten lawsuits). Environmental Shakedown through bastardized application of science is halfway there, but there is so much more I could write on CBD and its executive director Kieran Suckling.

One of the sources I interviewed just sent me this after reviewing the final draft: “You nailed this one.  You use words well.  Thanks. As you say, reasonable people can disagree on energy issues and still be cordial and even friends.  I know I would love to have you for a neighbor and argue with you, but it would always be friendly and with good humor.  How interesting that an energy advocate like you and a wildlifer like me (who opposes some energy development–certainly not all) can be on exactly the same page when it comes to radical enviros such as CBD.”

Marita82313

Marita Noon

Executive Director, Energy Makes America Great, inc.

PO Box 52103, Albuquerque, NM 87181

505.239.8998

Commentary by Marita Noon

Executive Director, Energy Makes America Great Inc.

Contact: 505.239.8998, marita@responsiblenergy.org

Words: 2148

Environmental Shakedown through bastardized application of science, policy and education

Over a three-year period, 2009-2012, Department of Justice data shows American taxpayers footed the bill for more than $53 million in so-called environmental groups’ legal fees—and the actual number could be much higher. The real motivation behind the Endangered Species Act (ESA) litigation, perhaps, could have more to do with vengeance and penance than with a real desire to protect flora and fauna.

On May 7, I spoke at the Four Corners Oil and Gas Conference in Farmington, New Mexico. During the two-day event, I sat in on many of the other sessions and had conversations with dozens of attendees. I left the event with the distinct impression that the current implementation of the ESA is a major impediment to the economic growth, tax revenue, and job creation that comes with oil-and-gas development. I have written on ESA issues many times, most recently I wrote about the lesser prairie chicken’s proposed “threatened” listing (which the Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS] listed on March 27) and the Oklahoma Attorney General’s lawsuit against the federal government over the “sue and settle” tactics of FWS and the Department of the Interior.

While at the conference, I received an email announcing that FWS has asked a federal court for a six-month delay in making a final determination on whether to list the Gunnison sage grouse as an endangered species—moving the decision past the November elections. Up for re-election, Senator Mark Udall (D-CO) “cheered” the extension request. The E & E report states: Colorado elected leaders “fear the listing could have significant economic impacts.”

Kent Holsinger, a Colorado attorney specializing in lands, wildlife and water, posited: “Senator Udall is among those lauding the move—perhaps because a listing decision would affect his fate in the U.S. Senate. Gunnison sage grouse populations are stable, if not on the increase. In addition, myriad state, local and private conservation efforts have been put into place over the last decade. Those efforts, and the Gunnison sage grouse, are at risk if the FWS pursues listing.”

The report continues: “WildEarth Guardians is not opposing the latest extension after Fish and Wildlife agreed to some extensive new mitigation measures that will be made in the interim, including increasing buffer zones around sage grouse breeding grounds, called leks, and deferring coal, oil and gas leasing, said Erik Molvar, a wildlife biologist with WildEarth Guardians.” It goes on to say: “But the Center for Biological Diversity, which is a party to the settlement agreements with WildEarth Guardians, said the latest extension is a bad move for the grouse, which it says has needed ESA protections for years.”

Two important items to notice in the Gunnison sage grouse story. One, the power the environmental groups wield. Two, part of appeasing the environmental groups involves “deferring coal, oil and gas leasing.”

It is widely known that these groups despise fossil fuels. The Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) brags about its use of lawsuits to block development—but it is not just oil and gas they block, it is virtually all human activity.

In researching for this week’s column, I have talked to people from a variety of industry and conservation efforts. The conversations started because I read something they’d written about CBD. Whether I was talking to someone interested in protecting big horn sheep, a fishing enthusiast, or an attorney representing ranching or extractive industries, CBD seems to be a thorn in their side. All made comments similar to what Amos Eno, who has been involved in conservation for more than forty years, told me: “CBD doesn’t care about the critters. They are creating a listing pipeline and then making money off of it.” Environmental writer Ted Williams, in a piece on wolves, called CBD: “perennial plaintiffs.”

New Mexico rancher Stephen Wilmeth directed me to a CBD profile he’d written. In it he addressed how the CBD’s efforts targeted livestock grazing and sought “the removal of cattle from hundreds of miles of streams.” Wilmeth states: “CBD has elevated sue and settle tactics, injunctions, new species listings, and bad press surrounding legal action to a modern art form. Consent decrees more often than not result in closed door sessions with concessions or demands made on agency policy formulation.”

In a posting on the Society for Bighorn Sheep website titled: Legal tactics directly from the Center for Biological Diversity, board member Gary Thomas states: “The Center ranks people second. By their accounting, all human endeavors, agriculture, clean water, energy, development, recreation, materials extraction, and all human access to any space, are subordinate to the habitat requirements of all the world’s obscure animals and plants. But these selfish people don’t care about any person, plant, or animal. The Center collects obscure and unstudied species for a single purpose, specifically for use in their own genre of lawsuits. They measure their successes not by quality of life for man nor beast, but by counting wins in court like notches in the handle of a gun.”

You’d expect someone like me, an energy advocate, to dis the CBD—and I have (CBD is not too fond of me)—but how’d it get such a broad-based collection of negativity from within the environmental community?

Ted Williams told me: “environmentalists who are paying attention are not happy with CBD.” He has written the most comprehensive exposé on CBD that can be found—for which he was threatened with a lawsuit. Without Williams’ work, one has to resort to bits and pieces off the internet to put together CBD’s modus operandi—but there is plenty to choose from!

One of the most interesting ones to catch my eye was a part of the post on SheepSociety.com. There, Thomas points out the fact that the three founders of CBD are ex-forest service workers. He states: “To donors, their motives appear altruistic. To the informed, they look more like a 20-year quest for revenge for their firing.”

I am fairly well acquainted with CBD, but Thomas’ accusation was new to me—though it fit what I knew. (One of the very first pieces I ever wrote, when I originally got into this work seven plus years ago, was on the one and only legal victory ever won against CBD. Arizona rancher Jim Chilton won a defamation suit against CBD with a $600,000 dollar settlement. Nearly everyone I talked to as a part of my research for this story mentioned Chilton’s name with reverence.

I dug around and found an interesting story from Backpacker Magazine that gave credence to Thomas’ claim. The February 2003 issue features a multi-page profile on Kieran Suckling, co-founder and executive director. Addressing the three founders, who were working for the Forest Service, Backpacker reports: “All three of them were frustrated by their agencies’ inaction.” The story goes on to explain how the threesome “hatched a plan” to petition the Forest Service and force it to list the spotted owl.

Then, I found a 2009 profile on Suckling in High Country News (HCN). It quotes Suckling describing how the roots of his full-time activism started while working for the Forest Service doing spotted owl surveys: “We had signed contracts saying we wouldn’t divulge owl locations, but we went the next day to the Silver City Daily Press, with a map that told our story. We were fired within seconds. That was the start of us becoming full-time activists.”

These snippets help explain Suckling’s animosity toward the Forest Service and other government agencies. CBD is gleeful over its results. It has sued government agencies hundreds of times and has won the majority of the cases—though many never go to court and are settled in a backroom deal (hence the term: “sue and settle”). Thomas writes: “They are extremely proud to report that single-handedly they deplete the U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s entire annual budget, approximately $5 million, for endangered species listings year after year by forcing them to use their limited funds defending lawsuits instead of their intended purpose.”

The HCN piece describes Suckling’s approach to getting what he wants—which he explains in the New Yorker, as “a new order in which plants and animals are part of the polity”: “The Forest Service needs our agreement to get back to work, and we are in the position of being able to powerfully negotiate the terms of releasing the injunction. … They [federal employees] feel like their careers are being mocked and destroyed—and they are. So they become much more willing to play by our rules and at least get something done. Psychological warfare is a very under-appreciated aspect of environmental campaigning.”

“In CBD speak,” adds Wilmeth, “the suggestion of playing by the rules equates to its rules of manipulating positive outcomes for its mission.”

Putting the pieces together, it does appear, as Thomas asserts, that Suckling is on a 20+ year “quest for revenge” for being fired—vengeance that American taxpayers are funding.

Suckling is an interesting character. The Backpacker story cites his ex-wife, who said the following: “He’s not tethered on a daily basis to the same things you and I are tethered to.”

Tierra Curry is another name that comes up frequently in CBD coverage. CBD’s staff section of the website lists her as “senior scientist” and says she “focuses on the listing and recovery of endangered species.” As Warner Todd Huston reports: “Curry has an odd profile for an activist. She once claimed to have enjoyed dynamiting creek beds in rural Kentucky and taking perverse pleasure at sending fish and aquatic animals flying onto dry land and certain death. Now Curry spends her time filing petitions to ‘save’ some of the same animals she once enjoyed killing.”

Perhaps Curry’s frenetic listing efforts are her way of doing penance for her childhood penchant of killing critters.

The role vengeance and penance may play in CBD’s shakedown of the American public is just a hypothesis based on facts. But the dollars paid out are very real.

In an April 8, 2014 hearing before the House Committee on Natural Resources, fifth-generation rancher and attorney specializing in environmental litigation, Karen Budd-Falen talked about the need for ESA reform, as four different House bills propose: “Public information regarding payment of attorney’s fees for ESA litigation is equally difficult to access.” Addressing HR 4316—which requires a report on attorney’s fees and costs for ESA related litigation—she says: “It should not be a radical notion for the public to know how much is being paid by the federal government and to whom the check is written.” As she reports in her testimony, Budd-Falen’s staff did an analysis of the 276-page spreadsheet run released by the Department of Justice (DOJ) listing litigation summaries in cases defended by the Environment and Natural Resources Division, Wildlife Section. She explains: “The spreadsheets are titled ‘Endangered Species Defensive Cases Active at some point during FY09-FY12 (through April 2012).’ Although the DOJ release itself contained no analysis, my legal staff calculated the following statistics.” Budd-Falen then shows how she came up with the nearly $53 million figure of taxpayer money paid out over an approximate three-year period. However, she then shows how her own Freedom of Information Act requests have proven “that the DOJ does not keep an accurate account of the cases it defends”—making the actual dollar figure much higher.

Budd-Falen has stated: “We believe when the curtain is raised we’ll be talking about radical environmental groups bilking the taxpayer for hundreds of millions of dollars, allegedly for ‘reimbursement for attorney fees.’”

Budd-Falen’s research shows that for groups like CBD—who sue on process not on substance—it really is about the money.

Eno believes that for the CBD, it isn’t about the critters: “CBD endangers the endangered species program on multiple fronts. First, their petitions and listing suits use up significant financial and personnel resources of both Office of Endangered Species and solicitors office in DOI. This means less funding and personnel devoted to species recovery. Second, CBD suits antagonize and jeopardize recovery programs of cooperating federal land management agencies, particularly USFS and BLM. Third, their suits have hampered forest and grassland management thereby inviting forest fires which endanger both human and wildlife (sage grouse) communities throughout the west. Fourth, CBD suits antagonize, alienate and create financial hardship for affected private land owners, thereby reducing both public support and initiatives and active assistance for listed species recovery.”

Despite numerous attempts, the ESA has not had any major revisions in more than 25 years. The Wall Street Journal states: “The ESA’s mixed record on wildlife restoration and its impact on business have made the law vulnerable to critics.” Groups like CBD have twisted the intent of the law. Reform is now essential—not just to save taxpayer dollars, but to put the focus back on actually saving the species rather than, as Wilmeth calls it: “the bastardized application of science, policy and education.”

The author of Energy Freedom, Marita Noon serves as the executive director for Energy Makes America Great Inc. and the companion educational organization, the Citizens’ Alliance for Responsible Energy (CARE). Together they work to educate the public and influence policy makers regarding energy, its role in freedom, and the American way of life. Combining energy, news, politics, and, the environment through public events, speaking engagements, and media, the organizations’ combined efforts serve as America’s voice for energy.

 

 

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Will There Be A M”E”SD?

Editor: Mr. Ueckert is a resident of Edgewood interested in education in the community.  We appreciate his desire to express his opinions on the important issues facing the Moriarty-Edgewood School District (MESD)

The Future of “E” in MESD

By Jerry Ueckert

Who can say what will happen should MESD carry through and shutter Edgewood Elementary? Personally, I would like to see Moriarty and Edgewood grow together in a mutually beneficial relationship, but MESD seems bent on biting the hand that feeds it.

The Great Depression couldn’t kill Edgewood’s school or community spirit. The old Edgewood Schoolhouse was built as part of Roosevelt’s Works Projects Administration and community members joined together to construct the school from indigenous materials on land donated by the Bassett family. That school served generations of Edgewood families from 1938 to 1960, but after consolidation into the Moriarty District, the Edgewood school was shuttered and the community suffered a near death. By the late ‘60s, Edgewood had only an RV park, Paula Donner’s Realty, and the Horn gas station on its main street to serve as a reminder of its former days.

Once I-40 opened, Edgewood saw the addition of businesses on the four corners of the interchange, which brought new families and construction into the community. Within just a few years, Edgewood experienced a surge in population and Moriarty was too small to handle the load. A new Edgewood Elementary had to be constructed and only a few years later, an annex had to be built to keep up with the area’s growth.

Having their own school once again was cause for celebration. A revitalization of creative energy followed. Many artists began calling Edgewood home. New businesses were established and a new vision of Edgewood’s future rose from the dust.

Now it seems as if we’ve come full circle and are threatened once again with losing our elementary school. But rather than being prompted by declining enrollment or poor performance, the closure of Edgewood Elementary is based solely on finances. Evidence supporting the stated concerns of shuttering by Edgewood’s Town Council and Chamber of Commerce abound.

Elaine Simon, author of a project-based education course, “Schools and Community Development,” states, “Schools are often the one institution still surviving in low-income neighborhoods, and they serve as a point of pride and community for families. When a neighborhood loses its schools, it also loses an institution that builds relationships among local residents and binds generations, while it serves local children. Losing schools makes it all the more likely that these neighborhoods will deteriorate further.”

The Atlanta Journal – Constitution reported in 2010, “DeKalb County school officials decided Forrest Hills Elementary was too small to remain open, and neighbors say its closure has changed their community in palpable ways. Formerly active residents and many young parents have moved away. Community gatherings have grown smaller. The recession makes the impact on property values hard to determine, but many residents believe they’ve been damaged.”

Richard Layman, a Washington, DC urban/commercial district revitalization and transportation/mobility advocate, says, “Schools are fundamental anchors which build and maintain quality neighborhoods and communities. Therefore to maintain communities we need to maintain the schools located within them.”

Andy Smarick, a charter school advocate and author of “The Urban School System of the Future: Applying Principles and Lessons of Chartering”, says that closing neighborhood schools can have negative and unintended consequences, stating, “Even if it’s low-performing, at least it’s a stable institution and an indication that the government has at least some investment in that neighborhood.”

So, do we want a school district unwilling to invest in the welfare and future of the community? Faced with these questions, Edgewood residents have legitimate reasons for concern that have not been addressed by MESD. But having faced these questions before, they have proven their willingness and ability to rebuild their future, literally out of the very dirt beneath their feet.

How does that benefit MESD? The short answer is: it doesn’t.

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Paul Gessing’s, “Errors of Enchantment.”

Mr. Gessing previously granted permission for our use of his material from Errors of Enchantment and his Rio Grande Foundation. Needless to say we are are tremendously grateful for his generosity.

Please visit Rio Grande Foundation and Errors of Enchantment frequently. Now enjoy the article below and any related articles found through the links after Mr. Gessing’s post.

Most Principals and Teachers DO work hard for schools, but that doesn’t ensure success

“Recently, a representative of the New Mexico Association of Secondary School Principals wrote an opinion piece in the Albuquerque Journal defending his profession.

The most interesting part of the article comes toward the end where the author makes a clear grammatical error when he states, “Let’s not listen anymore to rhetoric that is being promoted by special interest groups that want us to believe that are schools are failing.” (emphasis added to the faulty wording which should be “our). I’ve certainly mis-typed and even mis-spelled words in my writing before, but having such a blatant error in an article written on behalf of school principals is not comforting.

More important is the sentence itself. “Special interests” want us to believe that schools are failing. I’m sure that as an educator, one gets tired of hearing about the failures of the system they are a part of, but that’s the issue, the system. As Capitol Report New Mexico reported just this week, New Mexico spends 20th most per pupil in the nation, but has some of the worst results when it comes to student achievement. Clearly something is failing.

And, yes, poverty is higher here and we have more minority students than most states, but Louisiana which has many of the same problems as New Mexicoincluding poor performance — has adopted the most robust school choice in the nation and an astonishing 91 percent of parents approve. If New Mexico’s principals really cared about their “customers” and wanted to improve the failing system they are a part of, wouldn’t they consider emulating Louisiana?”

English: Seal of New Mexico

English: Seal of New Mexico (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

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Wishin’

WishboneKerry2WebCR-5_7_14

Visit: TerrellAfterMath

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Who is at Fault

Where, who, or what is the fault for such an assignment as described below being foisted on young impressionable students.  Is it Common Core? The State of California? The school district and the school administrators? Or perhaps it is a combination of all the foregoing … Or, is it a problem at all.  What do you think?

Fair Use Notice

Muslim School Superintendent Defends Assignment Which Denies the Holocaust

By Onan Coca / 7 May 2014 /

I was once a school teacher. One of my most important goals was to try to instill the ability to think critically within each of my students. I rationalized that if I could teach my students to think critically no amount of indoctrination could every capture their minds. A critical thinker is one who can use their minds to see through the lies and propaganda and uncover the truth for themselves no matter the biases they’re face with.

Some educators in California are trying to rationalize a terrible Common Core related assignment with the logic I just laid out for you.

Here is the writing assignment.

When tragic events occur in history, there is often debate about their actual existence. For example, some people claim the Holocaust is not an actual historical event, but instead is a propaganda tool that was used for political and monetary gain. Based upon your research on this issue, write an argumentative essay, utilizing cited textual evidence, in which you explain whether or not you believe the Holocaust was an actual event in history, or merely a political scheme created to influence public emotion and gain. Remember to address counterclaims (rebuttals) to your stated claim. You are also required to use parenthetical (internal) citations and to provide a Works Cited page.

I’m not sure that first sentence is accurate. Can you think of other tragic events where we debate their actual existence? Does anyone debate if the bubonic plague wiped out millions of people? No. Does anyone debate that Mao’s Great Leap Forward wiped out millions of his own people through famine and violence? No. Does anyone debate the Rwandan genocide? No. Do we debate the eruption of Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompeii? No. How about the Spanish Inquisition? Uh-uh. The Trail of Tears? Nope.

Read more at http://eaglerising.com/6037/muslim-school-superintendent-defends-assignment-denies-holocaust/

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Rep Gowdy (R-SC): Do YOU Know

Fast Backward to the Last Quarter of 2013.

Satellite image of Benghazi

Satellite image of Benghazi (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After the Video … Fast Forward to Now (see below)

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Edgewood Chamber Friday Blast 5.2.14

  Friday Blast
          May 2, 2014
The Edgewood Chamber
…working for you!
 Economic DevelopmentThe EDC research study is happening now!
what would you  like to see in Edgewood’s future?  click below and fill out the form interactively online!

Economic Development Survey

All information is anonymous, so be sure to answer all of the questions.  We want  to prepare an accurate report, and we want to hear from everybody!
.

We will also be forming focus groups, and doing interviews with leaders at the state, county and local level. Deadline for the survey information
is May 15.

After the data is gathered, we will prepare an Economic Impact Preparation Report which will be used by our committee and leaders to determine what’s next for Edgewood!

 

 

Ambassadors…

have already been out visiting members to
make sure you are utilizing the services to which you are entitled! 

And if you would like to become an Ambassador, please let us know in the office!

 

Look for the new Chamber decals for members to place in your windows to announce that you are serious about your business and have joined the Edgewood Chamber of Commerce!

 

 

 

RETRO 66

-RETRO Events:

-Midway Trading Post Cleanup-

was fabulous!  A special thanks to Larry Failing of Northwest Masonry, Jace Alderson, and Jim Bouton
who put their talents together to fix the crumbling
wall on the front of Midway last Saturday!

Thanks to all of the volunteers, and thanks to

Domino’s Pizza, Windmill Water, The Town of Edgewood, Bill Gilmore, and all who helped to make the Midway Post…half way between Arizona and Texas on Route 66…a little better.

This is in preparation for Summer visitors and the

 Czech Film Crew coming Sunday, May 25th, 2014


-Whiting Bros sign refurbishment;
Exciting news for Whiting Bros! 

Zeon inspected the high sign at Whiting Bros. over the weekend and came to the conclusion that a catastrophe could occur if an attempt was made to remove it from the poles. 

 They are more comfortable sending a crew to Moriarty to do the work in place.  The sign will be strengthened and restored right before our eyes!

Zeon will schedule the work at their weekly meeting on

Friday and let us know by Tuesday of next week what will

happen and when.  Sal has given all of this his ok

 and is anxious to see work begin!

We are still planning to have our celebration when the

NM Rt. 66 Car Cruise comes through town in June,

 so get those t-shirts pressed and GET READY!!!!!!

We are looking for someone to do a documentary of the entire process.  Please contact; Debbie Pogue at manager@sunseton66.com

 

     Area Happenings

This Friday Blast Section is reserved for your events or happenings in the area!  If you have an upcoming event or a special happening that you would like to see in the Blast, please email it to the office by Wednesday. Approved information will be reviewed and inserted in the Blast on the following Friday.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Let’s Celebrate!!!

Bethel Community Storehouse

27th Annual Birthday Blast!

Saturday May 3rd 10-5

Live entertainment

Jumper for the kids

Face Painting

Balloons Refreshments And a big Sale!!!

Call 832-6642 for more info

 

East Mountain Auto & RV Repair

invites you to join us for our

 

Customer Appreciation Day -

May 3rd, 2014

10 am – 2 pm

 

We are celebrating 4 years of serving our friends and neighbors in the East Mountains.

 

There will be

 

FREE Hot Dogs, Bratwurts, Sodas and Snacks

FREE Car Wash by the Youth of Valley View Church (Donations Appreciated for Summer Camp)

FREE Brakes and Front End Inspections

FREE Prizes

FREE Demonstrations – BG Products and Fuel Brand Differences

Music by Garyoke

 

Please invite your friends and neighbors to join us – we look forward to seeing you!

Light Pole Banners

If you are interested in a banner advertising your business along Route 66 or State Road 344 in Edgewood, you can still order yours!

 If there is a vacant spot or if the Town occupies a spot you wish to occupy along Route 66 and 344, you  

can order through the town office,
only $90.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                     

  

      Edgewood Chamber      Join us on Facebook CLICK HERE FOR FACEBOOKBoard MeetingMonday May 5 at 6:15pm
Chamber office

 

Luncheon

Thursday May 8

11:30 am
Edgewood

Community Center
Special Speaker will be Misty Miller Moonshine, CEO of
SASS who will tell us about “End of Trail” coming in June.

 

Mixer

Thursday May 15
Wild Life West
and
The Bear Barn

 

Triple Crown Corporate Partners for 2014

RICH Ford Edgewood
EPCOR Water
Wal-Mart
The Independent
SASS

 

Executive Director:

         Madeline Heitzman


Board of Directors

President:
Chris Hopper       2015

Vice President
Robin Markely      2014
Secretary:
Babara Ormand   2015

Treasurer:
Martha Eden          2014   

 

Board Members at Large:

Ray Seagers                  2015

Saul Araque                   2015

Howard Calkins              2014
Tom Torres                    2014

Julie Bassett                  2015

Committees:
Economic Development:

Tom Torres – Jim Bouton

Ambassadors:

                   Howard Calkins

Political Affairs & By Laws:
Ray Seagers

Events:         Robin Markley

Education:   Julie Bassett
Programs:    Staff/Committee
Luncheon:     Martha Eden
Leadership Alumni Group
Kathy Courreges

RETRO Route 66:  

               Madeline Heitzman

Town of Edgewood
Meetings:

meets First and Third Wednesdays of the month
at 6:30pm
Edgewood Community Center
  Planning & Zoning meets First and Third Tuesdays of the month at 6:00pm Edgewood Community Center.

Other Chambers:
East Mountain Chamber meets
the first Thursday of the month at
11:30am.  Call 281-1999 orinfo@eastmountainchamber.comMoriarty Chamber meets
at noon the third Tuesday of the month at the Moriarty Civic Center.  Call 832-4087

 

Mountainair Chamber meets the first Tuesday of the month at 11:30am. 847-2975  or
mcc@mountainairchamber.com

 

About Us 
Hours of Operation:
Monday – Thursday
       9am – 5pmFridays by appointment.
Since we’re a one person office, when we have other meetings or members to visit, we’re not here. Call 850-2523  and we’ll be sure to meet you!Location:95 State Road 344 Ste 3
(Library/Chamber Bldg)
Edgewood, New Mexico

Phone Number

     505-286-2577
e-mail:

info@
edgewoodchambernm.com

 

 

 

 

 

If you are a chamber member,
you can leave your business cards, rack cards and flyers at the Visitors center inside the South door to the Library. Be sure to get your information over here.
It’s part of your benefit as an Edgewood Chamber member!

Stop by the office to see
Madeline if you have
any questions ,
or call my cell 850-2523.

2012 Edgewood Chamber of Commerce – All rights reserved Address:PO Box 457 Edgewood

PO Box 457, Edgewood, NM 87015, USA

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Oakland Student Beats the Odds With a 5.0 GPA & 1200 SAT SCORE

Chuck Ring:

What’s that about judging a book by its cover?

Originally posted on BrownGirlsCONNECT:

Akintunde Ahmed, a high school senior with a 5.0 GPA who has already been accepted to multiple ivy league schools, gets books out of his locker before heading to his first class of the day at Oakland Technical High School in Oakland, CA, Wednesday April 2, 2014. Photo: Michael Short, The Chronicle

Akintunde Ahmed, a high school senior with a 5.0 GPA who has already been accepted to multiple ivy league schools, gets books out of his locker before heading to his first class of the day at Oakland Technical High School in Oakland, CA, Wednesday April 2, 2014. Photo: Michael Short, The Chronicle

By Dawn Boykin

Akintunde Ahmad’s future could have turned out like any other young black male growing up in the East Oakland streets, but it is amazingly quite different.

There is much to be celebrated for this 17-year old Oakland Tech High student who has been accepted to numerous top tier schools including; Yale, Brown, Columbia, Northwestern, USC, UCLA, Howard, Chapman, Cal Poly and Cal State East Bay.

Akintude has a 5.0 GPA and a 2100 (out of 2400) on the SAT. He keeps a screen shot of his grades on his phone for proof.

While there has been…

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Suzie Kolber: How to Express Your Condolences for a Loved One

How to Express Your Condolences for a Loved One

It can be difficult to know what to say when someone passes away. Death is often an uncomfortable topic, making it hard to express your feelings of condolence and sympathy to the survivor. Here are some effective ways you can express your condolences based on what is appropriate and what you feel the most comfortable with.
A Letter of Condolence
Back before technology made instant communication the norm, letters were the traditional way of expressing condolences. Even with the other options available, they are still a good way to show your support and concern. The main benefit with letters of condolences is that they can be read when it is convenient and re-read as often as needed. They can be shared with others to help with the grieving process.
When writing a letter of sympathy and condolence, you should always think about the person to whom you are writing as well as the deceased. Your letter should reflect the relationship you have or had with each person. Stay true to your personality. If you are a more formal person, then it is appropriate that your letter also sound more formal. On the other hand, if you are more laid-back and casual, your letter can also demonstrate that. Don’t be concerned that there is a right or wrong way to sound in a letter.
Messages of Condolence
Thanks to the internet, you can now send messages of support as soon as you hear the sad news of someone’s death. This allows you to offer support immediately, often when it is most needed. A quick text message or email can let the person know you heard the news and are offering your condolences without going into great detail. This is also a good method for those people that prefer short messages.
When writing a message, remember that you can keep it short and sweet. The person reading the message may be busy so it is acceptable to get right to the point. If you feel that you need to say more, you can follow up with a letter or phone call at a later time.
Flowers
If you do not know the family or didn’t know the deceased very well but want to express your condolences, it is perfectly acceptable to just send flowers or a financial donation to the organization of the family’s choice.
A simple card with a single message can convey your sympathies without requiring you to compose an entire message. This option is appropriate for many situations, including when the person is a co-worker that you only knew by name or someone you knew in passing in the community. Just make sure you include your full name so the person knows who the card came from.
A Phone Call or In-Person Visit
A phone call or personal visit is often the appropriate method of conveying your condolences when it is someone you knew very well or were related to. However, many people are not sure what to say and avoid the one-on-one interaction. The important thing to remember is that it is the fact that you called that the bereaved will remember more than what you say. In fact, don’t feel like you have to say a great deal besides “I’m sorry for your loss” or some other version.
If you are comfortable talking about the deceased, you can communicate your feelings to the person. It is appropriate to reminisce about special memories or occasions. You can even tell a funny story about the deceased person without feeling guilty. In fact, it may be just what the other person needed to hear after all of the somber moments and sadness they have been feeling.
Timing
The timing of when to express your condolences through the various methods can vary. There is no hard and fast rule. For instance, if you just heard about someone’s death even though it was six months ago, you can send a letter or email stating that you just learned of the news. You never know when your message could come at a good time to cheer them up. Grief extends long past the funeral or memorial service.
You can also prepare the way for a phone call or visit through a letter or message by saying that you will talk with them next week or in a couple of weeks.
Your Choice
Any of these methods are acceptable ways of expressing your condolences for a loved one. The choice is up to you based on the situation and what you feel most comfortable with. After all, it is more important that the bereaved feel your support than in how you choose to show it.

 

Suzie_Kolber_ObitsSuzie Kolber is a writer at http://obituarieshelp.org/words_of_condolences_hub.html The site is a complete guide for someone seeking help for writing sympathy messages, condolence letters and funeral planning resources.

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