Saved Memories About Memorial Day For Memorial Day 2014

 

THE FOLLOWING WAS OFFERED AS A PART OF VALLEY VIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH’S WEEKLY UPDATE.  IT WAS SENT TO THE CONGREGATION ON MAY 28, 2010 BY THE PASTOR, BRANDON SHAFFER.  WE FIRST POSTED IT ON MAY 30, 2010 (DAY BEFORE MEMORIAL DAY) AND WE POST IT NOW ON THE DAY BEFORE MEMORIAL DAY, MAY 26 2014

A Note From Brandon

Memorial Day, perhaps more than any other holiday, was born of human necessity. Deep inside all of us lies a fundamental desire to make sense of life and our place in it and the world. What we have been given, what we will do with it and what we will pass to the next generation is all part of an unfolding history, a continuum that links one soul to another. Abraham Lincoln pondered these thoughts in the late fall of 1863. His darkest fear was that he might well be the last president of the United States, a nation embroiled in the self-destruction of what he described as “a great civil war..testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure.” He began his remarks with those words as he stood on the battlefield near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th of that year. The minute’s speech that became known as Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address turned into what might be called the first observance of Memorial Day. Lincoln’s purpose that day was to dedicate a portion of the battlefield as a cemetery for the thousands of men, both living and dead, who consecrated that soil in the sacrifice of battle. Said Abraham Lincoln: “That from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause which they gave the last full measure of devotion…that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom…” The next year, a pleasant Sunday in October of 1864 found a teenage girl, Emma Hunter, gathering flowers in a Boalsburg, Pennsylvania cemetery to place on the grave of her father. He was a surgeon who had died in service to the Union Army in that great Civil War. Nearby, Mrs. Elizabeth Meyer was strewing flowers upon the grave of her son Amos, a private who had fallen on the last day of the battle of Gettysburg. Emma respectfully took a few of her flowers and put them on the grave of Amos. Mrs. Meyer, in turn, laid some of her freshly cut blooms on the grave of Dr. Hunter. Both women felt a lightening of their burdens by this act of honoring each other’s loss, and agreed to meet again the next year. This time they agreed they would also visit the graves of those who had no one left to honor them. Both Emma Hunter and Elizabeth Meyer returned to the cemetery in Boalsburg on the day they had agreed, Independence Day, July 4, 1865. This time, though, they found themselves joined by nearly all the residents of the town. Dr. George Hall, a clergyman, offered a sermon, and the community joined in decorating every grave in the cemetery with flowers and flags. The custom became an annual event at Boalsburg, and it wasn’t long before neighboring communities established their own “Decoration Day” each spring. About that same time in 1865, a druggist in Waterloo, New York, Henry C. Welles, began promoting the idea of decorating the graves of Civil War veterans. He gained the support of the Seneca County Clerk, General John B. Murray, and they formed a committee to make wreaths, crosses and bouquets for each veteran’s grave. On May 5, 1866, war veterans marching to martial music led processions to each of three cemeteries, where the graves were decorated and speeches were made by General Murray and local clergymen. The village itself was also decorated with flags at half-mast, evergreen boughs and mourning black streamers. Also, as the Civil War was coming to a close in the spring of 1865, Women’s Auxiliaries of the North and South moved from providing relief to the families and soldiers on their own sides to joining in efforts to preserve and decorate the graves of both sides. A woman of French extraction and leader of the Virginia women’s movement, Cassandra Oliver Moncure, took responsibility of coordinating the activities of several groups into a combined ceremony on May 30. It is said that she picked that day because it corresponded to the Day of Ashes in France, a solemn day that commemorates the return of the remains of Napoleon Bonaparte to France from St. Helena. In 1868, General John A. Logan, first commander of the Grand Army of the Republic issued a General Order establishing May 30 as an official memorial day to pay respect to all those who had died, in war or peace. His order was that the men in his command should spend a portion of that day policing the gravesites, decorating them and supporting whatever ceremonies they could. He hoped that this would spark enough interest to make Memorial Day a permanent national observance. In the intervening decades, Memorial Day has been observed every year, though the day was re-established from May 30 to the last Monday in May. In 1966, President Lyndon Johnson also sanctioned Waterloo, New York as the “official” birthplace of Memorial Day because of the extensive ceremonies established there in 1866. Perhaps General Logan was simply making official what the nation yearned for and spontaneously began to form after the near total destruction of the Civil War. It is that sharing of loss, honoring the sacrifices of those who made possible the lives we enjoy today, and family connections across the generations that keep Memorial Day in our hearts…and always will. SOURCE: “John Shepler’s Writing in a Positive Light.”

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Memorial Day Memories For Memorial Day 2013

 THE FOLLOWING WAS OFFERED AS A PART OF VALLEY VIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH’S WEEKLY UPDATE.  IT WAS SENT TO THE CONGREGATION ON MAY 28, 2010 BY THE PASTOR, BRANDON SHAFFER.  WE FIRST POSTED IT ON MAY 30, 2010 (DAY BEFORE MEMORIAL DAY) AND WE POST IT NOW ON MEMORIAL DAY, MAY 27 2013

A Note From Brandon

Memorial Day, perhaps more than any other holiday, was born of human necessity. Deep inside all of us lies a fundamental desire to make sense of life and our place in it and the world. What we have been given, what we will do with it and what we will pass to the next generation is all part of an unfolding history, a continuum that links one soul to another. Abraham Lincoln pondered these thoughts in the late fall of 1863. His darkest fear was that he might well be the last president of the United States, a nation embroiled in the self-destruction of what he described as “a great civil war..testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure.” He began his remarks with those words as he stood on the battlefield near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th of that year. The minute’s speech that became known as Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address turned into what might be called the first observance of Memorial Day. Lincoln’s purpose that day was to dedicate a portion of the battlefield as a cemetery for the thousands of men, both living and dead, who consecrated that soil in the sacrifice of battle. Said Abraham Lincoln: “That from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause which they gave the last full measure of devotion…that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom…” The next year, a pleasant Sunday in October of 1864 found a teenage girl, Emma Hunter, gathering flowers in a Boalsburg, Pennsylvania cemetery to place on the grave of her father. He was a surgeon who had died in service to the Union Army in that great Civil War. Nearby, Mrs. Elizabeth Meyer was strewing flowers upon the grave of her son Amos, a private who had fallen on the last day of the battle of Gettysburg. Emma respectfully took a few of her flowers and put them on the grave of Amos. Mrs. Meyer, in turn, laid some of her freshly cut blooms on the grave of Dr. Hunter. Both women felt a lightening of their burdens by this act of honoring each other’s loss, and agreed to meet again the next year. This time they agreed they would also visit the graves of those who had no one left to honor them. Both Emma Hunter and Elizabeth Meyer returned to the cemetery in Boalsburg on the day they had agreed, Independence Day, July 4, 1865. This time, though, they found themselves joined by nearly all the residents of the town. Dr. George Hall, a clergyman, offered a sermon, and the community joined in decorating every grave in the cemetery with flowers and flags. The custom became an annual event at Boalsburg, and it wasn’t long before neighboring communities established their own “Decoration Day” each spring. About that same time in 1865, a druggist in Waterloo, New York, Henry C. Welles, began promoting the idea of decorating the graves of Civil War veterans. He gained the support of the Seneca County Clerk, General John B. Murray, and they formed a committee to make wreaths, crosses and bouquets for each veteran’s grave. On May 5, 1866, war veterans marching to martial music led processions to each of three cemeteries, where the graves were decorated and speeches were made by General Murray and local clergymen. The village itself was also decorated with flags at half-mast, evergreen boughs and mourning black streamers. Also, as the Civil War was coming to a close in the spring of 1865, Women’s Auxiliaries of the North and South moved from providing relief to the families and soldiers on their own sides to joining in efforts to preserve and decorate the graves of both sides. A woman of French extraction and leader of the Virginia women’s movement, Cassandra Oliver Moncure, took responsibility of coordinating the activities of several groups into a combined ceremony on May 30. It is said that she picked that day because it corresponded to the Day of Ashes in France, a solemn day that commemorates the return of the remains of Napoleon Bonaparte to France from St. Helena. In 1868, General John A. Logan, first commander of the Grand Army of the Republic issued a General Order establishing May 30 as an official memorial day to pay respect to all those who had died, in war or peace. His order was that the men in his command should spend a portion of that day policing the gravesites, decorating them and supporting whatever ceremonies they could. He hoped that this would spark enough interest to make Memorial Day a permanent national observance. In the intervening decades, Memorial Day has been observed every year, though the day was re-established from May 30 to the last Monday in May. In 1966, President Lyndon Johnson also sanctioned Waterloo, New York as the “official” birthplace of Memorial Day because of the extensive ceremonies established there in 1866. Perhaps General Logan was simply making official what the nation yearned for and spontaneously began to form after the near total destruction of the Civil War. It is that sharing of loss, honoring the sacrifices of those who made possible the lives we enjoy today, and family connections across the generations that keep Memorial Day in our hearts…and always will. SOURCE: “John Shepler’s Writing in a Positive Light.”

 

T r i b u t e

The winter sun glistens on the white marble tomb,

but we sense no remorse, no hint of gloom.

No regret that he marched when others ran,

true to his homeland, here lies a man.

At a time of turmoil, in a land of cowards,

he went to the strife.

In a steamy Asian jungle, where locals feared to go,

for us, he gave his life.

Under white marble rests this hero, now dead,

yet where are the tears that his life’s blood was shed?

Honored he rests in this hallowed ground,

where a sentry’s step is the only sound.

His sleep is eternal, under polished stone.

Except to God, forever unknown!

BY Robert Steiner, Edgewood, NM USA

United States Army, Retired/Vietnam Veteran

English: Picture showing the changing of the g...

English: Picture showing the changing of the guards at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington D.C. On the left is the commander, in the middle is the guard ending his patrol, and on the right is the guard about to begin his patrol. I took this picture and release it into the public domain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Related articles

An American Hero — An American Name

No doubt many reading this will have heard of Navy SEAL Mike Monsoor and his unselfish deeds.  What many may not have seen and heard is footage of his funeral or footage of the Medal of Honor award ceremony where he was awarded the medal posthumously.

As the title says in part, “… An American Name.”  The video footage link of his funeral ceremony is posted below with the Medal of Honor ceremony video following:

Ceremony Honoring US Navy SEAL Mike Monsoor

Medal Ceremony

In case you wonder about the last three words of the title.  The answer can be found with a little research and careful interpretation.

Please see the related articles below:

Related articles

From The Patriot Post: Memorial Day Is NOT On Sale

Thanks To The Patriot Post For Their Generosity In Allowing The Use Of This Piece.  Please Consider Subscribing To The Patriot Post. Click On The Link Below:

The Patriot Post (www.patriotpost.us/subscribe/ )

By Mark Alexander · Thursday, May 24, 2012

Millions of Patriots Have Already Paid the Full Price

“I am well aware of the toil and blood and treasure that it will cost to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States.” –John Adams

Memorial Day provides a stark contrast between the best of our nation’s Patriot sons and daughters versus the worst of our nation’s civilian culture of consumption.

Amid the sparse, reverent observances of the sacrifices made by millions of American Patriots who paid the full price for Liberty, in keeping with their sacred oaths, we are inundated at every turn with the commercialization of Memorial Day by vendors who are too ignorant and/or selfish to honor this day in accordance with its purpose.

Indeed, Memorial Day has been sold out. And it’s no wonder, as government schools no longer teach civics or any meaningful history, and courts have excluded God (officially) from the public square.

In his essay “The Contest In America,” 19th-century libertarian philosopher John Stuart Mill wrote, “War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things; the decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks nothing worth a war, is worse. A man who has nothing which he cares more about than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance at being free, unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself.”

It is that “decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling” which accounts for why so many “miserable creatures” have downgraded Memorial Day to nothing more than a date to exploit for commercial greed and avarice. While units large and small of America’s Armed Forces stand in harm’s way around the globe, many Americans are too preoccupied with beer, barbecue and baseball to pause and recognize the priceless burden borne by generations of our uniformed Patriots. Likewise, many politicos will use Memorial Day as a soapbox to feign Patriotism, while in reality they are in constant violation of their oaths to our Constitution.

That notwithstanding, there are still tens of millions of genuine American Patriots who will set aside the last Monday in May to honor all those fallen Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coastguardsmen who have refreshed the Tree of Liberty with their blood, indeed with their lives, so that we might remain the proud and free. My family, which humbly descends from generations of American Patriots from the American Revolution forward, will honor the service and sacrifice of our nation’s fallen warriors by offering prayer in thanksgiving for the legacy of Liberty they have bequeathed to us, and by participating in respectful commemorations.

Since the opening salvos of the American Revolution, nearly 1.2 million American Patriots have died in defense of Liberty. Additionally, 1.4 million have been wounded in combat, and tens of millions more have served honorably, surviving without physical wounds. These numbers, of course, offer no reckoning of the inestimable value of their service or the sacrifices borne by their families, but we do know that the value of Liberty extended to their posterity — to us — is priceless.

Who were these brave souls?

On 12 May 1962, Gen. Douglas MacArthur addressed the cadets at the U.S. Military Academy, delivering his farewell speech, “Duty, Honor and Country.” He described the legions of uniformed American Patriots as follows: “Their story is known to all of you. It is the story of the American man at arms. My estimate of him was formed on the battlefields many, many years ago and has never changed. I regarded him then, as I regard him now, as one of the world’s noblest figures — not only as one of the finest military characters, but also as one of the most stainless.”

Gen. Douglas MacArthur

Gen. MacArthur continued:

His name and fame are the birthright of every American citizen. In his youth and strength, his love and loyalty, he gave all that mortality can give. He needs no eulogy from me, or from any other man. He has written his own history and written it in red on his enemy’s breast.

But when I think of his patience under adversity, of his courage under fire, and of his modesty in victory, I am filled with an emotion of admiration I cannot put into words. He belongs to history as furnishing one of the greatest examples of successful patriotism. He belongs to posterity as the instructor of future generations in the principles of liberty and freedom. He belongs to the present, to us, by his virtues and by his achievements.

In twenty campaigns, on a hundred battlefields, around a thousand campfires, I have witnessed that enduring fortitude, that patriotic self-abnegation, and that invincible determination which have carved his statue in the hearts of his people.

From one end of the world to the other, he has drained deep the chalice of courage. As I listened to those songs of the glee club, in memory’s eye I could see those staggering columns of the First World War, bending under soggy packs on many a weary march, from dripping dusk to drizzling dawn, slogging ankle deep through mire of shell-pocked roads; to form grimly for the attack, blue-lipped, covered with sludge and mud, chilled by the wind and rain, driving home to their objective, and for many, to the judgment seat of God.

I do not know the dignity of their birth, but I do know the glory of their death. They died unquestioning, uncomplaining, with faith in their hearts, and on their lips the hope that we would go on to victory. Always for them: Duty, Honor, Country. Always their blood, and sweat, and tears, as they saw the way and the light.

Duty. Honor. Country — these are not for bargain sale or discount.

On Memorial Day of 1982, President Ronald Reagan offered these words in honor of Patriots interred at Arlington National Cemetery: “I have no illusions about what little I can add now to the silent testimony of those who gave their lives willingly for their country. Words are even more feeble on this Memorial Day, for the sight before us is that of a strong and good nation that stands in silence and remembers those who were loved and who, in return, loved their countrymen enough to die for them. Yet, we must try to honor them not for their sakes alone, but for our own. And if words cannot repay the debt we owe these men, surely with our actions we must strive to keep faith with them and with the vision that led them to battle and to final sacrifice.”

President Ronald Reagan

President Reagan continued:

Our first obligation to them and ourselves is plain enough: The United States and the freedom for which it stands, the freedom for which they died, must endure and prosper. Their lives remind us that freedom is not bought cheaply. It has a cost; it imposes a burden. And just as they whom we commemorate were willing to sacrifice, so too must we — in a less final, less heroic way — be willing to give of ourselves.

It is this, beyond the controversy and the congressional debate, beyond the blizzard of budget numbers and the complexity of modern weapons systems, that motivates us in our search for security and peace. … The willingness of some to give their lives so that others might live never fails to evoke in us a sense of wonder and mystery.

One gets that feeling here on this hallowed ground, and I have known that same poignant feeling as I looked out across the rows of white crosses and Stars of David in Europe, in the Philippines, and the military cemeteries here in our own land. Each one marks the resting place of an American hero and, in my lifetime, the heroes of World War I, the Doughboys, the GIs of World War II or Korea or Vietnam. They span several generations of young Americans, all different and yet all alike, like the markers above their resting places, all alike in a truly meaningful way.

As we honor their memory today, let us pledge that their lives, their sacrifices, their valor shall be justified and remembered for as long as God gives life to this nation. … I can’t claim to know the words of all the national anthems in the world, but I don’t know of any other that ends with a question and a challenge as ours does: “O! say does that Star-Spangled Banner yet wave, O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?” That is what we must all ask.

Indeed, in this era when Liberty is being crushed under the weight of Democratic Socialism, Patriots must all ask that question, and act accordingly.

For the Fallen, we are certain of that which is noted on all Marine Corps Honorable Discharge orders: “Fideli Certa Merces” — to the faithful there is certain reward.

Thomas Jefferson offered this enduring advice to all generations of Patriots: “Honor, justice, and humanity, forbid us tamely to surrender that freedom which we received from our gallant ancestors, and which our innocent posterity have a right to receive from us. We cannot endure the infamy and guilt of resigning succeeding generations to that wretchedness which inevitably awaits them if we basely entail hereditary bondage on them.”

We owe a great debt of gratitude to all those generations who have passed the Torch of Liberty to succeeding generations. In accordance, I humbly ask that each of you call upon all those around you to observe Memorial Day with reverence.

To prepare hearts and minds for Memorial Day, take a moment and read about the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Join with other Patriots across the nation who will be placing flags at headstones in your local military cemetery (generally the Saturday prior to Memorial Day).

I invite you to view these tributes to our Armed Forces and to God and Country at the Patriot YouTube Channel.

In honor of American Patriots who have died in defense of our great nation, lower your flag to half-staff from sunrise to 1200 on Monday. (Read about proper flag etiquette and protocol.) Join us by observing a time of silence at 1500 (your local time), for remembrance and prayer. Offer a personal word of gratitude and comfort to any surviving family members you know who are grieving for a beloved warrior fallen in battle.

On this and every day, please pray for our Patriot Armed Forces now standing in harm’s way around the world in defense of our liberty, and for the families awaiting their safe return.

“Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” –John 15:12-14

Memorial Day: Remember The Reason

As we approach Memorial Day (May 28th) please remember its purpose.  This cartoon reminder was sent by Pastor Max Sanchez.  There are more cartoon reminders sent by Pastor Max and they are to be posted through Memorial Day:

Description: cid:1.3649326607@web111719.mail.gq1.yahoo.com

Related articles

Governor Susana Martinez Commemorates Memorial Day — Orders Flags At Half-Staff

POSTED AS A PUBLIC SERVICE BY GADABOUT-BLOGALOT


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

May 30, 2011 


Contact: Scott Darnell 

(505) 819-1398 

scott.darnell@state.nm.us


GOVERNOR SUSANA MARTINEZ COMMEMORATES MEMORIAL DAY

Governor Also Orders Flags Flown at Half-Staff


SANTA FE – Governor Susana Martinez issued the following statement commemorating Memorial Day and paying tribute to the men and women of the United States Military who made the ultimate sacrifice in the service of their country. Later today, Governor Martinez will participate in Memorial Day services in both Santa Fe and Albuquerque. 


“Today is a time for reflection, remembrance, and gratitude for the brave men and women who lost their lives while serving our country,” said Governor Martinez. “Our troops live by an oath to defend our Constitution, our freedoms, and our way of life. Memorial Day is a time to show our appreciation for all of our active duty military members, reservists, and veterans who answered that call. Most importantly, this is an opportunity to pay tribute to those who made the ultimate sacrifice. All New Mexicans are grateful for the dedication, courage, and commitment demonstrated by our military members and their families as we remember those who gave all.”

Governor Martinez has also issued an Executive Order for flags to be flown at half-staff in New Mexico from sunrise until noon today, May 30, in recognition of Memorial Day and the men and women who died while serving our country and protecting our freedoms.


###

After Forty-Three Years — Remembering Still

Visitors check out displays celebrating Naval ...

Image by Official U.S. Navy Imagery via Flickr

John E. Abrams, an Edgewood Town Councilor, has graciously agreed to tell part of his father’s story when his father served as a Navy pilot during the Vietnam War.  He has provided  an excerpt from  ” Behind The Lines  stories authored by combatants and others who have experienced military combat and other aspects of some wars in which the United States has been involved.  The stories have been compiled and edited by Andrew Carroll.  I’ll  leave the rest to Councilor Abrams and other sources:

My Dad was a Decorated Navy helicopter pilot. He was killed in action in Vietnam in 1968 when his aircraft was shot down along with his wingmen. None of the crewmen of the aircraft on that mission survived.

War all around him, my Dad would take time to record and send my Mom audio tape letters. He left us his thoughts about the war in his own voice, with the battle sounds in the background. Even now, after 43 years, it is very difficult for me to read his words, and more difficult still to hear the tapes. I am proud to share an excerpt of one of his audio letters. I hope this stands as a small tribute to the difficult and dangerous situations our military men and women in conflicts face daily.

This excerpt was transcribed and reproduced in a book containing letters and commentary from Americans at war beginning with the American Revolution. The book is titled “Behind the Lines” authored by men and women in conflict, compiled and edited by Andrew Carroll. ISBN 0-7432-5616-6. I recommend reading it.

From an audio letter in the voice of my father – Lt. (Senior Grade) John L . Abrams USN

Well this war is different than any other war, you could ask somebody from World War II, or Korea if they ever killed anybody, and they’d probably say, “well I don’t know.” And they’d be telling the truth. They were firing at long ranges, long distances, to emplacements, this type of thing. This isn’t that kind of war. We’re firing from 600 meters away. We fire, we hit, we see what we hit. We see the results of our hit. We see the wounded, and of course we see the dead. Of course, Charley gives it back to us too. We take a lot of hits in the aircraft. Occasionally one of us get it too. We’ve had three door gunners wounded – one of which died – since we’ve been here. I’ve been shot at quite a few times, and I think I’ve got a purple heart coming for a minor thing that happened here a couple weeks ago (one of three). There’s nobody here that’s not getting shot at, although this part of the war isn’t as highly publicized as what is going on in the north. The part we’re doing down here nobody wants to talk about. It’s a dirty job. Its women, twelve, fifteen-year-old boys and grown men that we’re killing because they’re killing Vietnamese and trying to kill us. Some of the atrocities Charlie commits are unbelievable. It’s really hard to believe some of the things that he does. In this thing the last few days we liberated a VC prisoner of war camp. Some of the people have been in the camp for two and a half to three years.” There is the sound of gunfire crackling in the background. “I wish that guy would stop firing, it’s making me nervous…. Yesterday for example, we were cleared to go into an area where Charlie supposedly had an arms cache. We went into the area —- sure enough, there was all camouflaged — arms cache. So we went in, circled the area one time at high altitude, rolled into our strike. All of a sudden, people start running out of the hooches — we call them hooches, they’re grass houses — running out of the hooches that this material was all stacked around. And every one of them had a saffron robe on. A saffron robe is a bright orange robe — kind of the color of a flight suit, if you remember what that looked like — that the Buddhist monks wear,— every one of them. Now what were Buddhist monks doing where there was a large cache of Charlie equipment, and no Buddhist pagoda around the area? Charlie’s not dumb, but he’s not smart either, really. They ran out of the hooch, ran across the rice paddy, and they never got any further. Now maybe there were some Buddhist monks among them. Possibly there were. And Charlie was trying to escape along with them. But they all got it…

Editor: Lt. John Leon Abrams, as his son has said above, gave final full-measure to his country and its citizens on July 13, 1968:

Lieutenant John Leon Abrams was serving as a pilot with the Helicopter Attack (Light) Squadron Three Seawolves when he was killed in action in the Mekong Delta region of South Vietnam.  His UH-1B helicopter was hit by .50 caliber enemy fire, causing the transmission to seize at 800 feet.  Also killed in the crash were his copilot, LtJG James Henry Romanski, and his crewmen, AMH3 Raymond Douglas Robinson and AMS3 Dennis Michael Wobbe.  His fellow Seawolves remember John’s bravery and devotion to duty.
HE IS NOT FORGOTTEN.

The above blue text is provided by:

Together We Served

If you follow the link,above you will find other information for Lieutenant John L. Abrams.  Additionally, Lt. Abrams service information can be found by clicking here  and here including comments and tributes from those who served with him.  We want to express our heartfelt thanks to Lieutenant Abrams and all of his family for the sacrifices they have made on our behalf.

You may find related links below.

Projects For WWII Veterans

Washington DC: United States National World Wa...

Image by wallyg via Flickr

By Chuck Ring (GadaboutBlogalot ©2009 -2011

Quote Freely From The Article – Leave The Pseudonym Alone

From now until next Monday, May 30th (US Memorial Day) we will be posting videos, fliers, posters, audio, slide shows and other information about our United States Armed Forces men and women.  The following link will take you to a video explaining a project to fly WWII veterans to their memorial in Washington, D.C.  The video also explains the project includes a documentary movie to be shown in November of this year.  Please watch the video and read any narrative provided, then copy the URL for the video and paste it into an e-mail.  When you send the e-mail, tell your friends and loved ones to continue passing the video to others.  Please watch the video through to the end and ask those that you forward it to for the same consideration.  The producers of the movie are trying to have 50,000 additional viewers by Memorial Day:

PROJECTS FOR WWII VETERANS

Please click on the image to read details on the image and the memorial.