December 7, 1941 … Never Forget

December 7, 1941 — Never Forget

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Seventy – three years past on this day, America’s mettle, and that of her fighting men and women was tested, perhaps as never before.  The day we commemorate as Pearl Harbor Day was confusing and most surprising as Japan sought to begin the destruction of our country.

 

Many events have since transpired which have also tested our resolve, but this action, at its beginning would test us in a severe way.  Just a few veterans remain that saw  “a date which will live in infamy.”  But, a nation remains to remember those that died and to give continuing thanks to those remaining.

Listen closely to FDR’s speech to hear that he does not say “day,”  as many still report;  his reference is to a particular day (December 7, 1941) but he says, “date.”

 

The video and poster available below, each speak to our commitment in the past, and for the future.  Click on the link for the video and stay on the channel for a high resolution version of President Roosevelt’s declaration of war, along with other famous speeches:

 

Roosevelt’s Speech – December 8, 1941

English: United States President Franklin D. R...

English: United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt signing the declaration of war against Japan, in the wake of the attack on Pearl Harbor. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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After Forty-Six Years — Remembering Still

John E. Abrams, an Edgewood Town Councilor, has graciously agreed to tell part of his father’s story when his father served as a Navy pilot during the Vietnam War. He has provided an excerpt from ” Behind The Lines“ stories authored by combatants and others who have experienced military combat and other aspects of some wars in which the United States has been involved. The stories have been compiled and edited by Andrew Carroll. I’ll leave the rest to Councilor Abrams and other sources:

My Dad was a Decorated Navy helicopter pilot. He was killed in action in Vietnam in 1968 when his aircraft was shot down along with his wingmen. None of the crewmen of the aircraft on that mission survived.

War all around him, my Dad would take time to record and send my Mom audio tape letters. He left us his thoughts about the war in his own voice, with the battle sounds in the background. Even now, after 43 years, it is very difficult for me to read his words, and more difficult still to hear the tapes. I am proud to share an excerpt of one of his audio letters. I hope this stands as a small tribute to the difficult and dangerous situations our military men and women in conflicts face daily.

This excerpt was transcribed and reproduced in a book containing letters and commentary from Americans at war beginning with the American Revolution. The book is titled “Behind the Lines” authored by men and women in conflict, compiled and edited by Andrew Carroll. ISBN 0-7432-5616-6. I recommend reading it.

From an audio letter in the voice of my father – Lt. (Senior Grade) John L . Abrams USN

Well this war is different than any other war, you could ask somebody from World War II, or Korea if they ever killed anybody, and they’d probably say, “well I don’t know.” And they’d be telling the truth. They were firing at long ranges, long distances, to emplacements, this type of thing. This isn’t that kind of war. We’re firing from 600 meters away. We fire, we hit, we see what we hit. We see the results of our hit. We see the wounded, and of course we see the dead. Of course, Charley gives it back to us too. We take a lot of hits in the aircraft. Occasionally one of us get it too. We’ve had three door gunners wounded – one of which died – since we’ve been here. I’ve been shot at quite a few times, and I think I’ve got a purple heart coming for a minor thing that happened here a couple weeks ago (one of three). There’s nobody here that’s not getting shot at, although this part of the war isn’t as highly publicized as what is going on in the north. The part we’re doing down here nobody wants to talk about. It’s a dirty job. Its women, twelve, fifteen-year-old boys and grown men that we’re killing because they’re killing Vietnamese and trying to kill us. Some of the atrocities Charlie commits are unbelievable. It’s really hard to believe some of the things that he does. In this thing the last few days we liberated a VC prisoner of war camp. Some of the people have been in the camp for two and a half to three years.” There is the sound of gunfire crackling in the background. “I wish that guy would stop firing, it’s making me nervous…. Yesterday for example, we were cleared to go into an area where Charlie supposedly had an arms cache. We went into the area —- sure enough, there was all camouflaged — arms cache. So we went in, circled the area one time at high altitude, rolled into our strike. All of a sudden, people start running out of the hooches — we call them hooches, they’re grass houses — running out of the hooches that this material was all stacked around. And every one of them had a saffron robe on. A saffron robe is a bright orange robe — kind of the color of a flight suit, if you remember what that looked like — that the Buddhist monks wear,— every one of them. Now what were Buddhist monks doing where there was a large cache of Charlie equipment, and no Buddhist pagoda around the area? Charlie’s not dumb, but he’s not smart either, really. They ran out of the hooch, ran across the rice paddy, and they never got any further. Now maybe there were some Buddhist monks among them. Possibly there were. And Charlie was trying to escape along with them. But they all got it…

Editor: Lt. John Leon Abrams, as his son has said above, gave final full-measure to his country and its citizens on July 13, 1968:

Lieutenant John Leon Abrams was serving as a pilot with the Helicopter Attack (Light) Squadron Three Seawolves when he was killed in action in the Mekong Delta region of South Vietnam. His UH-1B helicopter was hit by .50 caliber enemy fire, causing the transmission to seize at 800 feet. Also killed in the crash were his copilot, LtJG James Henry Romanski, and his crewmen, AMH3 Raymond Douglas Robinson and AMS3 Dennis Michael Wobbe. His fellow Seawolves remember John’s bravery and devotion to duty.
HE IS NOT FORGOTTEN.

The above blue text is provided by:

Together We Served

If you follow the link,above you will find other information for Lieutenant John L. Abrams. Additionally, Lt. Abrams service information can be found by clicking here and here including comments and tributes from those who served with him. We want to express our heartfelt thanks to Lieutenant Abrams and all of his family for the sacrifices they have made on our behalf.

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Roger Mickelson’s History Today 5.19.14

In 1536, having been found guilty on charges of adultery, Anne Boleyn—the second wife of King Henry VIII of England and the mother of Queen Elizabeth I—was beheaded.

 

Henry VIII of England, who devised the Statute...

Henry VIII of England, who devised the Statute as a way of alleviating his financial problems. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1571, Spanish explorer Miguel López de Legazpi established the city of Manila in the Philippines. Legazpi served as the first governor of the Philippines, from 1565 until his death. In 1570 he sent an expedition to the northern island of Luzon, arriving there himself the next year. After deposing a local Muslim ruler, he established Manila, which became the capital of the new Spanish colony and Spain’s major trading port in East Asia. Legazpi repulsed two attacks by the Portuguese, in 1568 and 1571, and easily overcame the poorly organized Filipinos’ resistance. The Muslims in the southern islands resisted Spanish rule up to the 19th century, but Islām was weak in Luzon and the northern islands, and Legazpi and his chaplain, Andrés de Urdaneta, were able to lay the foundations for the conversion of the people to Christianity, which proved their most durable legacy.

 

English: A statue of Miguel López de Legazpi (...

English: A statue of Miguel López de Legazpi (just outside of Fort San Pedro, Cebu City) the Spanish conquistador, who led Spain while they conquered the Philippines (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Thirty Years’ War:    In 1643, the French army defeated the Spanish in the Battle of Rocroi. The Spanish army had crossed the French border from the Netherlands and then stopped to besiege the small fortress of Rocroi, 55 miles northeast of Reims. French Duke d’Enghien advanced rapidly, knowing that the Spaniards were expecting reinforcements. On May 18 both armies positioned themselves with the bulk of their infantry in the center, flanked by two wings of cavalry. Early on May 19 Enghien led a successful cavalry charge of the French right against the Spanish left. The French cavalry of the left also attacked the Spanish right, against his orders, and was repulsed. The Spaniards then followed through by starting their assault on the French center. Meanwhile, Enghien’s cavalry turned to its left and cut its way through the middle of the enemy infantry, thus isolating the elite Spanish soldiers in the front ranks from their less steady German and Italian allies in the rear. Enghien’s troops then reached the cavalry on the Spanish right flank, who were still engaged with the French in their front, and dispersed them. The 8,000 elite Spanish infantry were by now completely isolated, as Enghien’s attack had broken up the rear ranks of supporting German and Italian infantry. Late in the day, when all the available French as well as the captured Spanish guns were turned on them, the Spanish asked to surrender. But as Enghien and his staff were coming to receive the surrender some Spaniards mistakenly opened fire. The enraged French hurled themselves on the Spanish infantry, killing more than half and capturing the rest. The Battle of Rocroi marked the decline of Spanish military power.

 

The Battle of Rocroi (1643), the symbolic end ...

The Battle of Rocroi (1643), the symbolic end of Spain’s grandeur; the slow decline sets in. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1780, a mysterious darkness enveloped much of New England and part of Canada in the early afternoon.

 

Napoleonic Wars:    In 1802, Napoleon created the Legion of Honor, the premier order of the French republic.

 

French Legion of Honor Medal

French Legion of Honor Medal (Photo credit: Pen Waggener)

In 1890, Ho Chi Minh—future founder of the Indochina Communist Party (1930) and its successor, the Viet Minh (1941), and president (1945–69) of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam)—was born in Hoang Tru, Vietnam, French Indochina.

 

Ho Chi Minh statue in front of the City Hall o...

Ho Chi Minh statue in front of the City Hall of Ho Chi Minh City. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Regards, Roger Mickelson
Source material includes Associated Press International and Encyclopædia Britannica.
All warfare is based on deception.”              Sun TzuThe Art of War

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Obama: Don’t Listen To Them, Come Die On This Hill With Me

The title above was meant to repeat the attitude of Obama when it comes to citizens’ relationship with their elected congress people.
There is something terribly little “mannish,” about such an attitude, but then, we are talking about the man habitually using his office to shine above the citizens around him.  The problem with such an attitude when it come to “punishing,” Syria is Obama doesn’t know anything about waging war; nor does he have sense enough to use the counsel he could obtain from real advisers.   
         
We can hope, but we cannot expect Obama to grow-up and there is not time enough to teach him the ways of war.  Below is an article from Reason.com which  puts Obama’s deficiencies in the open … where they should be.

As members of Congress mull over President Barack Obama’s request for authorization for military strikes on Syria, the response from constituents so far has been loud and consistent: No.

And that response is as it should be.  The American citizens are just tired of being taken for fools who will believe everything a spying president and his security apparatus feeds them.  The majority of Americans ain’t buying anymore pablum and binkies they have sold us in the past.

Obama’s message to those Congress members? Don’t listen to them. Listen to me! From ABC News:

President Obama today conceded that he could fail to convince the American public to back proposed U.S. military strikes against Syria, but said that members of Congress should vote to approve the action anyway.

I am hoping the congress critters have had enough of failed ideas from Mr. Obama, and they send a clear message of, “Not no, but Hell no.”  Perhaps I am somewhat delusional, but one can hope.

 “It’s conceivable that, at the end of the day, I don’t persuade a majority of the American people that it’s the right thing to do,” Obama said in response to a question from ABC News during a solo press conference at the conclusion of the G20 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia.

The above quote should give pause and allow or cause us to say, “Exactly what we hope you reap from this bad idea.”

But, Obama said, members of Congress need to consider the lessons of World War II and their own consciences and vote ‘yes’ to authorize the use of force, even if it means going against the opinion of the majority of their constituents.

What do they have to lose by ignoring the people who vote for them in favor of an ill-formed plan from a second-term president looking forward to a lifetime of easy five-figure dinner speeches?

What “they,” have to lose is self-respect if they vote to bomb and a terrible president if they vote not to bomb.  I’ll vote for the latter.

December 7, 1941 — Never Forget

Seventy-one years past on this day, America’s mettle and that of her fighting men and women were tested, perhaps as never before.  The day we commemorate as Pearl Harbor Day was confusing and most surprising as Japan sought to begin the destruction of our country.

Many events have since transpired which have also tested our resolve, but this action, at its beginning would test us in a severe way.  Just a few veterans remain that saw  “a date which will live in infamy.”  But, a nation remains to remember those that died and to give continuing thanks to those remaining. Listen closely to FDR’s speech to hear that he does not say “day,”  as many still report;  his reference is to a particular day (December 7, 1941) but he says, “date.”

The video and poster available below, each speak to our commitment in the past, and for the future.  Click on the link for the video:

Roosevelt’s Speech – December 8, 1941

English: United States President Franklin D. R...

English: United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt signing the declaration of war against Japan, in the wake of the attack on Pearl Harbor. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Left Click-Larger Image
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Heritage Foundation: No Need To Panic

The Heritage Foundation
New Common Sense
Applying First Principles to the Issues of Today

No Need to Panic

Conservatives are, rightly, disappointed.

A president who’s recklessly spent trillions, expanded government and put many of our principles and institutions at risk will enjoy a second term. But it’s no time for despair. Now is the time to stand up and declare we will continue to work to rein in big government and defend freedom.

Voters gave conservatives a mandate of sorts two years ago, electing a Tea Party-supported House of Representatives to check President Obama’s excesses. And it worked.

After ramming through measures including Obamacare and Dodd-Frank in his first two years, the president failed to deliver any big liberal programs after that.

In 2012, voters returned the president to the White House, yet also made him the first president since World War II re-elected without improving his margin of victory. “The bad news is that Paul Ryan remains in the House,” quips Hugh Hewitt. But, “The good news is that he remains in the House, and that the rising generation of governors remains incredibly talented and innovative and they now add Mike Pence to their number.”

President Obama won a clear victory in the Electoral College (that’s one of the reasons it exists), but: “Much like Truman, Obama enters a second term with no mandate to speak of, and with roughly half of the country intractably opposed to his policies,” writes Jay Cost at the Weekly Standard. Obama’s grand themes were Big Bird and birth control.

His campaign mostly consisted of attack ads and personal insults. He won, many say, by managing to stitch together a coalition of those seeking federal largesse.

“The Democratic Party is mostly an incoherent amalgam of interest groups, most of which are vying for benefits for themselves and their members at the expense of other Americans,” notes Yuval Levin. “This kind of party is why America’s founders worried about partisanship and were, at least at first, eager to avoid a party system. It is a bunch of factions more than a party.”

For their part, conservatives must find ways to limit big government. For as William McGurn warned,  the recent hurricane exposed its failures. “The irony is that modern American liberalism has become a movement grounded less in practical politics than a sort of religious fervor—and often requiring the same strong faith in the face of disappointment and failure. The difference, of course, is that while religions often promise to deliver in the next world, government is supposed to do it in this one.”

Conservatives can make headway in this divisive atmosphere by offering the right policy proposals. The end of the campaign brings the beginning of the governing season. We have a lot of work to do. From entitlement reform to national defense and energy policy, The Heritage Foundation has developed and will continue to advocate for the solutions the country needs.

Obamacare is dragging down our already struggling economy. Our nation is far beyond just broke; our national debt is $16 trillion (a 60 percent increase under President Obama) and climbing every day. A lame duck Congress will return to Washington to try to head off Taxmageddon. The present House of Representatives must hold the line over the next two months and refuse to sign on to even more spending or higher taxes. We must stop our national binge of spending, taxing and borrowing. And we will.

Whatever the policy battles, remember this above all, happy warriors: It’s the First Principles that undergird America that make this country great. Conservatives must work harder than ever before to defend them and to see them translated into the right public policies.

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Honor Our Veterans: November 11, 2012

It Was Armistice Day (11th Month, 11th day, 11th Hour, 1918)

The treaty to end the War To End All Wars was signed on November 11th, at 11 AM, 1918. The day was to be celebrated from that time on as Armistice Day.

We know of course, World War I did not end all wars and another World War (WWII) would kill young and old alike from its beginning in 1939 until its end in 1945.

The following, taken from the website Military.com explains the history of Armistince Day and how it came to be Veterans Day:

Veterans Day, formerly known as Armistice Day, was originally set as a U.S. legal holiday to honor the end of World War I, which officially took place on November 11, 1918. In legislation that was passed in 1938, November 11 was “dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be hereafter celebrated and known as ‘Armistice Day.’” As such, this new legal holiday honored World War I veterans.

In 1954, after having been through both World War II and the Korean War, the 83rd U.S. Congress — at the urging of the veterans service organizations — amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting the word “Veterans.” With the approval of this legislation on June 1, 1954, Nov. 11 became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

And so we do … honor our veterans, today November 11, 2012 and forward in time.

getimage.exe

17781943 poster, United States, World War II Artist Perlin, B. Publisher United States. Office of War Information Studio Name/Printer United States. Government Printing Office Historical period World War II

HERE FOR MORE VETERANS DAY POSTERS

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Never Forget — December 7, 1941

Seventy years past on this day, America’s mettle and that of her fighting men and women were tested, perhaps as never before.  The day we commemorate as Pearl Harbor Day was confusing and most surprising as Japan sought to begin the destruction of our country.

Many events have since transpired which have also tested our resolve, but this action, at its beginning would test us in a severe way.  Just a few veterans remain that saw  “a date which will live in infamy.”  But, a nation remains to remember those that died and to give continuing thanks to those remaining. Listen closely to FDR’s speech to hear that he does not say “day,”  as many still report;  his reference is to a particular day (December 7, 1941) but he says, “date.”

The video and poster available below, each speak to our commitment in the past, and for the future.  Click on the link for the video:

Roosevelt’s Speech – December 8, 1941

English: United States President Franklin D. R...

Image via Wikipedia- President Roosevelt Signs War Declaration Against Japan

Left Click-Larger Image
Related articles

Veterans Day 11/11/13

It Was Armistice Day (11th Month, 11th day, 11th Hour, 1918)

Veterans Day 2007 poster from the United State...
Image via Wikipedia

The treaty to end the War To End All Wars was signed on November 11th, at 11 AM, 1918. The day was to be celebrated from that time on as Armistice Day.

We know of course, World War I did not end all wars and another World War (WWII) would kill young and old alike from its beginning in 1939 until its end in 1945.

The following, taken from the website Military.com explains the history of Armistince Day and how it came to be Veterans Day:

Veterans Day, formerly known as Armistice Day, was originally set as a U.S. legal holiday to honor the end of World War I, which officially took place on November 11, 1918. In legislation that was passed in 1938, November 11 was “dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be hereafter celebrated and known as ‘Armistice Day.’” As such, this new legal holiday honored World War I veterans.

In 1954, after having been through both World War II and the Korean War, the 83rd U.S. Congress — at the urging of the veterans service organizations — amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting the word “Veterans.” With the approval of this legislation on June 1, 1954, Nov. 11 became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

And so we do … honor our veterans, today November 11, 2011 and forward in time.

getimage.exe

17781943 poster, United States, World War II Artist Perlin, B. Publisher United States. Office of War Information Studio Name/Printer United States. Government Printing Office Historical period World War II

HERE FOR MORE VETERANS DAY POSTERS

Remember D-Day — June 6th, 1944

150 mm World War II German gun emplacement in ...

Image via Wikipedia

By Chuck Ring (GadaboutBlogalot ©2009 -2011

Quote Freely From The Article – Leave The Pseudonym Alone

Sixty-seven years ago, I was four years of age, living on a farm five miles west of Dexter, NM.  Don’t tax your brain in any attempt to guess why Dexter is germane to this post … it is not..  And, you should not waste time on why I was 4 years old at the time.  Sixty-seven years is the number and time on which you might want to focus.  For that is how many years have passed since the United States and allied countries landed to continue the fight to end World War II .  9,000 Allied soldiers lost their life or suffered injuries in the drive to gain a foothold on France’s Normandy Coast and then march on to the interior and finally, across Europe.

The day is remembered in many ways and one of those ways is a Memorial in Bedford, VA.  According to the website for the memorial, Bedford suffered the highest per-capita  losses of any town in the nation. The wedbsite is full of tributes and educational opportunity.  Click here to pay a virtual visit to the D-Day Memorial.  Please check below for related links.

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